Spelt Sandwich Bread

spelt sandwich bread

We love to bake and eat traditional European breads like Italian pane toscano, French baguettes, and our awesome spelt corn rye bread. But for everyday use you’ve just got to have sandwich bread around. Naturally, home bread bakers can do a lot better than supermarket white or even whole wheat loaves. Most of the commercial spelt breads we see are whole grain, which some people don’t care for. This spelt sandwich bread recipe makes a high, light loaf. It has a nice soft crumb and a crisp crust, eminently suitable for sandwiches or toast. It makes excellent bread crumbs, too (not panko, but pretty good anyway).

Like all white spelt doughs, you may need to add more flour as you are kneading to keep it from being too sticky. Just keep your spelt flour handy and add it by the tablespoonful to your mixer while the dough is being kneaded.

The recipe is from the King Arthur Flour website, which has lots of excellent bread recipes, and is a premier source for baking ingredients and equipment, although they do not carry spelt.

Spelt Sandwich Bread Recipe

spelt sandwich bread         Prep Time: 3 hours
    Cook time: 30 to 35 minutes
    Makes: one loaf

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups white spelt flour
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 to 2/3 cup hot water, enough to make a soft, smooth dough* (see “tips,” below)
  • 1/4 cup melted butter or vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
  • 2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast

Instructions:

  1. To make the dough: In a large bowl, combine all of the ingredients and stir until the dough starts to leave the sides of the bowl. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased surface, oil your hands, and knead it for 6 to 8 minutes, or until it begins to become smooth and supple. Or mix and knead the dough using an electric mixer or food processor, or in a bread machine set to the dough or manual cycle.
  2. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover the bowl, and allow the dough to rise until puffy though not necessarily doubled in bulk, about 1 to 2 hours, depending on the warmth of your kitchen. If you’re using a bread machine, allow the machine to complete its cycle, then leave the dough in the machine until it’s doubled in bulk, perhaps an additional 30 minutes or so.
  3. Gently deflate the dough and transfer it to a lightly oiled work surface. Shape the dough into an 8″ log.
  4. Place the log in a lightly greased 8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ loaf pan, cover the pan loosely with lightly greased plastic wrap, and allow the bread to rise for about 60 minutes, until it’s domed about 1″ above the edge of the pan. A finger pressed into the dough should leave a mark that rebounds slowly. Towards the end of the rise, preheat your oven to 350°F.
  5. Place the log in a lightly greased 8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ loaf pan, cover the pan loosely with lightly greased plastic wrap, and allow the bread to rise for about 60 minutes, until it’s domed about 1″ above the edge of the pan. A finger pressed into the dough should leave a mark that rebounds slowly. Towards the end of the rise, preheat your oven to 350°F.
  6. Remove the bread from the oven, and cool it on a rack before slicing. Store the bread in a plastic bag at room temperature for several days; freeze for longer storage.
Adapted from: a recipe at kingarthurflour.com

Author: Daniel Lieberman

Daniel Lieberman is a cook and writer living in the hills of Western Massachusetts. When he's not cooking he listens to opera and reads a lot.

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